The butterbur is actually a member of the daisy family and grows to a height of around 70cms.
The White Goddess Turbary Woods Owl and Bird of Prey Sanctuary

Butterbur - Herborium - The White Goddess

Per-Ankh Feed

Saturday, 15 December 2018

Butterbur

Butterbur

Butterbur

(Petasites hybridus)

The butterbur is actually a member of the daisy family and grows to a height of around 70cms. The roundish, heart-shaped leaves of the butterbur are very large, producing some of the largest laves of any plant in Britain, sometimes as big as 3ft in diameter.

The male or stamen-bearing and the female or seed producing flowers grow on separate plants, which appear before the leaves and flower between March and May. The flowers appear in clusters in a dense spike, with small pink/purplish flowers, about 4mm across, in the shape of a five pointed star.

Found mostly in damp wooded areas, especially around the edges of ponds, lakes and streams. (Warning: Butterbur contains liver-toxic and possibly carcinogenic components called pyrrolizidine alkaloids.)

Folk names: Langwort. Umbrella Plant. Bog Rhubarb. Flapperdock. Blatterdock. Capdockin. Bogshorns. Butter-Dock

Planet: Mercury and Saturn

Magical Uses:

The seeds have been historically used for love divination. 'The seeds of butterdock must be sowed by a young unmarried woman half an hour before sunrise on a Friday morning, in a lonesome place. She must strew the seeds gradually on the grass, saying these words:

I sow, I sow!
Then, my own dear,
Come here, come here,
And mow and mow!

The seed being scattered, she will see her future husband mowing with a scythe at a short distance from her. She must not be frightened, for if she says, "Have mercy on me," he will immediately vanish! This method is said to be infallible, but it is looked upon as a bold, desperate, and presumptuous undertaking!'

Roots as a heart stimulant, diuretic and was used in medieval times to cure the plague!.  Gerard writes of the Butterbur: 'The roots dried and beaten to powder and drunke in wine is a soveraigne medicine against the plague and pestilent fevers, because it provoketh sweat and driveth from the heart all venim and evill heate; it killeth worms. The powder of the roots cureth all naughty filthy ulcers, if it be strewed therein.'  Many years ago, people used to wrap butter in the leaves of this plant, hence the name for this plant.  During the middle ages, the roots were used to remove skin blemishes.  It has been in use as a remedy in fevers, asthma, colds and urinary complaints, a decoction being taken warm in wineglassful doses, frequently repeated.

DISCLAIMER:
Please be aware that this information is provided solely for informational purposes only. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to using any herbs or treatments made from herbs.

Aeclectic Tarot

Aeclectic Tarot

Aeclectic Tarot

Magic Folk

Magic Folk

Magic Folk

Magical Times Magazine

Magical Times Magazine

Magical Times Magazine