Bragi - God of poets and skaldi. - Norse God. Bragi is the God of poets and the patron of all skaldi poets in Norse culture.
The White Goddess The Pendle Witches 1612-2012

Bragi - God of poets and skaldi. - Norse God

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Monday, 22 April 2019

Bragi - God of poets and skaldi.

Bragi is the God of poets and the patron of all skaldi (poets) in Norse culture. He is renowned for wisdom, and most of all for fluency of speech and skill with words. He is said to bring inspiration to poets and writers. The Norse word for poetry is bragr. It is said that runes were carved on the tongue of Bragi.

The God of Music

Although Odin had won the gift of poetry, he seldom made use of it himself. It was reserved for his son Bragi, the child of Gunlod, to become the god of poetry and music, and to charm the world with his songs.

    "White-bearded bard, ag'd
    Bragi, his gold harp
    Sweeps--and yet softer
    Stealeth the day."

            Viking Tales of the North (R. B. Anderson).

As soon as Bragi was born in the stalactite-hung cave where Odin had won Gunlod's affections, the dwarfs presented him with a magical golden harp, and, setting him on one of their own vessels, they sent him out into the wide world. As the boat gently passed out of subterranean darkness, and floated over the threshold of Nain, the realm of the dwarf of death, Bragi, the fair and immaculate young god, who until then had shown no signs of life, suddenly sat up, and, seizing the golden harp beside him, he began to sing the wondrous song of life, which rose at times to heaven, and then sank down to the dread realm of Hel, goddess of death.

    "Yggdrasil's ash is
    Of all trees most excellent,
    And of all ships, Skidbladnir;
    Of the AEsir, Odin,
    And of horses, Sleipnir;
    Bifroest of bridges,
    And of scalds, Bragi."

            Lay of Grimnir (Thorpe's tr.).

While he played the vessel was wafted gently over sunlit waters, and soon touched the shore. Bragi then proceeded on foot, threading his way through the bare and silent forest, playing as he walked. At the sound of his tender music the trees began to bud and bloom, and the grass underfoot was gemmed with countless flowers.

Here he met Idun, daughter of Ivald, the fair goddess of immortal youth, whom the dwarfs allowed to visit the earth from time to time, when, at her approach, nature invariably assumed its loveliest and gentlest aspect.

It was only to be expected that two such beings should feel attracted to each other, and Bragi soon won this fair goddess for his wife. Together they hastened to Asgard, where both were warmly welcomed and where Odin, after tracing runes on Bragi's tongue, decreed that he should be the heavenly minstrel and composer of songs in honour of the gods and of the heroes whom he received in Valhalla.

Worship of Bragi

As Bragi was god of poetry, eloquence, and song, the Northern races also called poetry by his name, and scalds of either sex were frequently designated as Braga-men or Braga-women. Bragi was greatly honoured by all the Northern races, and hence his health was always drunk on solemn or festive occasions, but especially at funeral feasts and at Yuletide celebrations.

When it was time to drink this toast, which was served in cups shaped like a ship, and was called the Bragaful, the sacred sign of the hammer was first made over it. Then the new ruler or head of the family solemnly pledged himself to some great deed of valour, which he was bound to execute within the year, unless he wished to be considered destitute of honour. Following his example, all the guests were then wont to make similar vows and declare what they would do; and as some of them, owing to previous potations, talked rather too freely of their intentions on these occasions, this custom seems to connect the god's name with the vulgar but very expressive English verb "to brag."

In art, Bragi is generally represented as an elderly man, with long white hair and beard, and holding the golden harp from which his fingers could draw such magic strains.

--~Attributes and Correspondences~--

Area of Influence:
Poetry, Wisdom, Speech, Inspiration

Norse

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-

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Idunn

-

-

-

-

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Harp

Poetry, Mead

-

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Ansuz

Runes, Poetry

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Norse - Gods and Goddesses

NameTitleType

Aegir

God of the ocean.

God

Balder

Fairest of the Gods

God

Bergelmir

Father of the Frost Giants.

God

Bestla

Mother Goddess.

Goddess

Borr

Creator God.

God

Bragi

God of poets and skaldi.

God

Buri

Creator God.

God

Bylgia

Water Goddess

Goddess

Dagur

The personification of day.

God

Dellingr

God of the Dawn.

God

Eir

Goddess of healing.

Goddess

Forseti

God of justice who settles court disputes in his gilded hall.

God

Freya

Goddess of love, beauty and sensuality.

Goddess

Freyr

God of fertility, sun and rain.

God

Frigg

Wife of Odin and the goddess of marriage and fertility.

Goddess

Gefion

Goddess of agriculture.

Goddess

Gerd

Goddess of Ferility

Goddess

Heimdall

God of light and protection.

God

Hel

Goddess of death.

Goddess

Hermod

The messenger of the gods.

God

Hodr

Blind god of darkness and winter.

God

Idun

Goddess of the spring and eternal youth.

Goddess

Jord

Goddess of the primitive and unpopulated earth.

Goddess

Kvasir

The wisest of the Vanir gods.

God

Lofn

Goddess of forbidden love, who blesses all illicit love affairs.

Goddess

Loki

Trickster god of the Norse.

God

Magni

Son of Thor and god of brute strength.

God

Mani

God of the moon

God

Miming

Minor forest god.

God

Mimir

God of knowledge and wisdom.

God

Nanna

Norse Goddess

Goddess

Njord

God of the sea, wind and fire.

God

Norns

The triple goddesses of fate and destiny.

Goddess

Nott

Goddess of night.

Goddess

Odin

God of war.

God

Ran

Goddess of storms and the drowned dead.

Goddess

Regin

God of metalworkers and craftsmen.

God

Rigr

Creator God.

God

Saga

Goddess of poetry and history.

Goddess

Sif

Goddess of the earth.

Goddess

Sjofn

Goddess of love, passion and marital harmony.

Goddess

Skadi

Goddess of Bowhunting.

Goddess

Sol

Goddess of the sun.

Goddess

Syn

Goddess of watchfulness and truth.

Goddess

Thor

Thunder-god and the protector of men and gods.

God

Tyr

God of Law.

God

Ullr

God of justice and duelling, archery and skiing.

God

Vali

Son of Odin

God

Valkyries

The battle-maidens.

Goddess

Var

Goddess of contracts and oaths.

Goddess

Ve

Creator God.

God

Vidar

Son of Odin and the god of silence and vengeance.

God

Vili

Creator God.

God

Volla

Goddess of Bounty and Fertility.

Goddess

Ymir

Primordial God.

God

Bibliography

  • The Witches God - Janet and Stewart Farrar
  • The Witches Goddess - Janet and Stewart Farrar
  • A Dictionary of Egyptian Gods and Goddesses - George Hart
  • Celtic Goddesses - Miranda Green
  • Gods, Demons and Symbols of Ancient Mesopotamia - Jeremy Black and Anthony Green
  • Maori Religion and Mythology - Edward Shortland
  • The Greek Myths - Robert Graves
  • Encyclopedia of Goddesses and Heroines, 2-Volume Set - Patricia Monaghan
  • Asgard and the Gods: The Tales and Traditions of Our Northern Ancestors - Wilhelm Wägner Macdovvall
  • The Mythology of all Races - Vol 1-12 - Louis H Gray
  • The Ancient Gods Speak - Edited by Donald B Redford
  • The Pyramid Texts - Faulkner
  • Aradia, Gospel of the Witches - Charles G. Leland
  • Myths of the Norsemen From the Eddas and Sagas - H. A. Guerber
  • The Theogony of Hesiod - translated by Hugh G. Evelyn-White 1914
  • Encyclopedia of Ancient Deities, 2-Volume Set - Charles Russell Coulter and Patricia Turner
  • Wikipedia

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